andyetf

Archive for October, 2011|Monthly archive page

Help Is On The Way!

In Uncategorized on October 24, 2011 at 8:00 am

From Reuters:
Talks between U.S. states and top banks over mortgage abuses are nearing agreement on resolving a major sticking point that has bogged down settlement negotiations for more than a year.

A deal could be reached by the end of the month, according to three people familiar with the talks.

Under the proposed terms of the settlement — which could total $25 billion — banks would get a broader relief from potential state civil lawsuits in exchange for refinancing underwater loans, those mortgages where borrowers owe more than their homes are worth, the sources said.

Falling Income

In Uncategorized on October 19, 2011 at 9:40 am

Household incomes are shrinking. Over the last two years average income dropped more than 6 percent. The median income now stands at $49,909. If you look at income since the start of the recession in 2007, income has dropped nearly 10 percent. That is the largest drop in income in several decades.

The reason wages are falling? People who lost jobs during the recession have taken pay cuts in order to get hired again. They average 17 percent less income in their new jobs.

News on the job front is not much better. Unemployment remains over 9 percent. The average time a person remains unemployed averages 40 weeks, the longest in more than 60 years.

If you are experiencing financial difficulties, you are not alone. Bankruptcy offers protection of your wages and assets from creditors. Give me a call if you need help.

Health Effects Of Foreclosure

In Uncategorized on October 3, 2011 at 7:49 am

From the New York Times.

A growing body of research shows that foreclosure itself harms the health of families and communities. In our 2008 survey of 250 people undergoing foreclosure in the Philadelphia area, 32 percent reported missing doctor’s appointments and 48 percent said they let prescriptions go unfilled, significantly higher rates than others in their community. A paper released last month by the National Bureau of Economic Research found that people living in high-foreclosure areas in New Jersey, Arizona, California and Florida were significantly more likely than those in less hard-hit neighborhoods to be hospitalized for conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart failure.

More than one-third of homeowners in our study had symptoms of major depression. The N.B.E.R. study found significantly more suicide attempts in high-foreclosure neighborhoods. For every 100 foreclosures, it found a 12 percent increase in anxiety-related emergency-room visits and hospitalizations by adults under 50. Losing a home disrupts social ties to neighbors, schools, jobs and health care providers — ties that under better circumstances promote good health. Neighborhoods suffer, not just homeowners.